ABOUT The Book

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Is there a way of exploring the work of students beyond just ‘right’ and ‘wrong’?

If mistakes are an important part of the learning process, do they need to be explored deeply?

Does a teacher stand to gain a better understanding of the workings of her students’ minds if an attempt is made to systematically examine the thought process behind every mistake?

What is the hidden takeaway (missed take) in every mistake, for a student as well as a teacher?

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Cover pic

Neeraja Raghavan

Neeraja Raghavan is Founder-Director of Thinking Teacher.

She has a doctorate degree in Chemistry from Princeton University, USA and her last position was Professor at Azim Premji University. She worked with Azim Premji Foundation for almost eight years, mainly in the field of Science teacher education, pedagogy and curriculum development. She has taught in several mainstream as well as alternative schools in India and has been the Principal of a couple of schools. She developed an Alternative Middle School Science Curriculum for SHIKSHAMITRA, Kolkata, a school for slum children, in 2007. She also developed the Middle School Science Curriculum for THE SCHOOL, Krishnamurti Foundation India, Chennai in March-May 2006, so as to suit their unique needs and ethos. Her research interests currently focus on teacher development through reflective practice.

Her publications include:

1. TEACHING TALES LEARNING TRAILS Co-authored with Vineeta Sood and Kamala Anilkumar (Notion Press, 2018)

2. THE REFLECTIVE TEACHER, with contributing editor Vineeta Sood (Orient Blackswan, 2015)

3. Co-edited Alternative Schooling in India (SAGE Publications, 2007) with Sarojini Vittachi

4. Co-edited CHILDHOOD REGAINED, a book on children rescued from child labour, brought out by HAND IN HAND, Tamil Nadu, in 2007.

5. CURIOUSER & CURIOUSER (Full Circle, 2003)

6. I WONDER WHY (Children’s Book Trust, 2004)

7. I WONDER HOW (Children’s Book Trust, 2006).

IN the media

Testimonial

Loved your work cant wait for your next book.

- Parry

You have excelled in love story writing simply loved reading your work madam

- Deepti

Its an epic love story

- Sonali

Could take my hands of your book.

- Geetika

I would want to read more of your work

- Lavaniya

Loved your style of writing I felt connected.

- Grace

Please let me know as soon as you write your next book cant wait to pick one.

- Bhavana

I loved your style of writing it felt so real . .

- Bushra

There should be more rom - com authors like you. Everyone should read your work.

- Kritika

Bought your novel online and thats the best work I have read so far.

- Kanisha

Read your sample pages cant wait for my book to arrive.

- Kesha

A must read book for sure.

- Preet

Read your work online on Amazon it was worth my time. A very strong recommendation for everyone.

- Gagan

Dont stop writing what an amazing book. I must admit.

- Deeps

Hi Amrit
Read ur book
It's filled with love
Keep writing pure love stories must needed.

- Deepti Sikarwar‎

Loved reading your work its one of teh best love stories I have read so far

- Shracha Rajput‎

Heard a lot about your work and I must whatever is said so far is quiet true. Loved your work

- Kriya‎

Would love to see your work to be published into a movie it is worth it.

- Jane

Magnificent style of writing its the first of its kind rom com so far. Love Love

- Brone

Keep writing more love stories like this as its is a after a very long time some has written such beautiful story.

- Amina

Great job.

- Amesha

book1

Teaching Tales, Learning Trails

How do the dynamics of a school spill over into the seemingly unconnected events at home, in the community, the nation, the world? Do they?
How often do we, as parents or teachers, act like our own parents/teachers? How often do we as students, experience a disconnect between what we are taught to do and what is implicitly expected of us? How much of those influences do we carry with us, as we start families and choose careers? Surely the ambitious CEO as well as the lackadaisical vagabond both went to some school that shaped them – in no small way? What were the teachers of today like – as school goers? What made them turn into teachers? How do parents experience the schools that they send their children to? What can happen if there is an attempt to create a dialogue between teachers and other teachers, teachers and parents, students and teachers?
Are such things even possible?
This is a set of ten stories based largely on events that actually unfolded but do not serve to depict entirely accurate portrayals of what transpired – ‘fictionalised fact’. The intent is not so much to produce memoirs as it is to set the reader off on an exploratory journey. The stories are followed by rich discussions between groups of principals, parents, students, teachers, teacher educators and pre-service teachers, as they reflect on the questions raised by these stories.
Neeraja Raghavan, Vineeta Sood and Kamala Anilkumar are teacher educators working with THINKING TEACHER, www.thinkingteacher.in and this is a THINKING TEACHER publication.

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Great reading for educators, students and parents.

- Ranjini Narasimhan

See All Reviews
book2

The Reflective Learner

Is there a way of exploring the work of students beyond just ‘right’ and ‘wrong’?
If mistakes are an important part of the learning process, do they need to be explored deeply?
Does a teacher stand to gain a better understanding of the workings of her students’ minds if an attempt is made to systematically examine the thought process behind every mistake?
What is the hidden takeaway (missed take) in every mistake, for a student as well as a teacher?
Four teachers (two language, two maths) examined such questions as part of their action research into students’ mistakes – and eventually effected a turnaround in the way that their ‘struggling’ students began to approach subjects like English and mathematics.
In this compilation of four engaging journeys, the impact of such an investigation on both the teacher and the taught emerges: as teachers begin to gain new insights into their own mental biases and tacit assumptions, students, too, begin to loosen their grip on age-old fears and prejudices – the phobia(s) slowly giving way to the desire to look for stimulating challenges.
There is also a roadmap for teachers who wish to try such an exploration in their own classes in order to empower students to turn into reflective learners.

Read More...

CONTACT

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